Tenure Rights, Human Rights and Redd+:Knowledge, Skills and Tools for Effective Results

Report
04-08-2014
Identifying, respecting, and advancing rights associated with forest resources can help ensure effective, efficient, and equitable implementation of efforts to reduce forest-related greenhouse gas emissions, also known as REDD+1. This report presents a framework for identifying and asserting tenure and human rights associated with forests and land use in the context of climate change policies and measures.

Identifying, respecting, and advancing rights associated with forest resources can help ensure effective, efficient, and equitable implementation of efforts to reduce forest-related greenhouse gas emissions, also known as REDD+1. This report presents a framework for identifying and asserting tenure and human rights associated with forests and land use in the context of climate change policies and measures.

Clearly defined land rights can help identify which actors are necessary to address drivers of forest change and help determine benefit sharing. Local resource management may even improve forest outcomes. Respecting human rights helps ensure that REDD+-related decisions are made in a fair and equitable manner, and supported by those with direct access to forest resources. These rights include cultural, livelihood, non-discrimination, participatory decision-making, access to justice, and resource-related rights, all of which can influence access, ownership, management, and use of forest resource.

There are a number of tools available to help ensure that rights are respected in the implementation of REDD+-related activities including impact assessments, participatory design, mapping and monitoring, and standards, laws and policies. Judicial and non-judicial mechanisms at scales ranging from the project to international levels can help resolve disputes that may involve tenure and human rights concerns. Several examples are provided in the report including one on timber concessions and pygmy communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

This case relates to World Bank lending associated with tenure concession reforms in the DRC. Pygmy groups requested inspection of World Bank lending to support a new commercial forest concession system in the DRC. An Independent Inspection Panel found that the World Bank violated policies by failing to identify the cultural property and spiritual value of forest areas to the Pygmy peoples or avoid impacts. While pygmy organizations provided critical leadership for this case, support from international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) helped indigenous groups to better understand and access the Inspection Panel. The World Bank Management’s response and subsequent actions from this case helped strengthen recognition of customary rights and led to some changes in forest concessions.

 

Christian Hite
USAID-supported Forest Carbon Markets and Communities (FCMC) Program
2014
31

Share this item

Submitted byrocio

Usefulness

0
1905 visits

Topics

Other
Other

Cross cutting

Indigenous knowledge

Keywords

Tenure rights
REDD+
Indigenous knowledge
tools

Countries

Worldwide

Geographic Coverage

International