'No time to Recover'

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This video shows the pastoralist men, women and children who are doing their best to adapt to a changing climate and how they are modifying their lives to adapt to increasing temperatures and drought frequency as well as unpredictable rains that are now falling in shorter but more intense episodes.

The pastoralists of the Borana have been herding their cattle for centuries. More frequent droughts due to climate change, overgrazing and mismanagement is testing their traditional coping mechanisms. 

Pastoralism in Ethiopia is more than a nomadic livelihood based on the wellbeing of one’s livestock. Pastoralist communities have shared a rich cultural history, a traditional support network, a unique economic system, and a collective social identity supported by kinship and clan loyalty. For centuries, pastoralist communities have moved through the Ethiopian lowlands effectively managing the potentially devastating impacts of severe drought, heavy rains and floods

 This video shows the pastoralist men, women and children who are doing their best to adapt to a changing climate and how they are modifying their lives to adapt to increasing temperatures and drought frequency as well as unpredictable rains that are now falling in shorter but more intense episodes. 

The video is based on scientific and community-based observations collected by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), CARE International and Save the Children UK (SCUK) in a 2009 study in the Borana and Shinile zones of Ethiopia.

 

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Ethiopia

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Pastoralism
Indigenous knowledge